Card Me: Mono Green

Mean Green
Going “mono green” in Magic: The Gathering has proven itself to be quite powerful in the current format. The No. 1 reason I chose to switch from my Simic deck to mono green stemmed from an abysmal performance at local tournaments with an alarming inconsistency.

To put it bluntly, Simic was just a crappy archetype without its money cards, and even then it was not even a high-tier archetype.

Stripping my deck of its blue color and going pure green meant I could streamline my strategies. Instead of running into situations where I would be screwed by an absence of a given color, just having green in my deck means I only need to draw lands to supplement my deck.

Of course, as a result, my deck lost its share of built-in tricks and potential versatility in favor of relying on what the one color (green in this case) had to offer.

——————————————————————————————————————

Champion of Lambholt
The Deck Recipe
The deck below has served me well so far. I only like to play Standard Format Deck Construction.

Though it is missing some strong green cards at the moment (i.e. such as a Garruk), the deck more or less functions pretty decently. With rotation coming up soon anyway, there is no point in hunting for cards that will be deemed no longer playable in Standard. I have to make use of this deck while I can.

Creatures
Arbor Elf x4
Elvish Mystic x4
Elvish Visionary x4
Scavenging Ooze x3
Strangleroot Geist x4
Champion of Lambholt x2
Elvish Archdruid x4
Predator Ooze x4
Deadbridge Goliath x1
Kalonian Hydra x1
Wolfir Silverheart
x3
Garruk’s Horde x1
Craterhoof Behemoth x1

Enchantments
Rancor x4

Lands
Forest x20

Sideboard
Alpha Authority x1
Fog x3
Naturalize x2
Pit Fight x3
Plummet x2
Predator’s Rapport x1
Ranger’s Guile x3
——————————————————————————————————————
Deck Strategy
The deck is geared as a “green ramp/mid-range” strategy. For instance, below is an example of how a “good” hand would function for this deck.

Turn One: Play a Forest and then an Arbor Elf/Elvish Mystic.

ForestArbor Elf

Turn Two: Play another Forest and then use the effect of Arbor Elf/Elvish Mystic to net an extra green mana for Predator Ooze.

Predator Ooze

Turn Three: Play another Forest for the this turn and then use the effect of Arbor Elf/Elvish Mystic again to net an extra green mana Deadbridge Goliath.

Deadbridge Goliath

So just three turns in, your board state would look like …

Arbor ElfPredator OozeDeadbridge GoliathForest
ForestForest

This is a nasty army of creatures at just three turns into the game. Plus, you have a good source of mana coming your way to play even bigger, scarier creatures a turn or two sooner if you can maintain this pace.

The deck is thus quite straightforward in this regard. It does not really rely on many fancy tricks or anything like that. It just focuses on playing big creatures to beat your opponent down with sheer power. It may not be stylish, but winning is winning. Sometimes, you need to sacrifice some style points for efficiency.

The sideboard just provides options to protect my big creatures from removal and other pesky cards.

For instance, Ranger’s Guile offers a great way of shielding my creatures from targeted effects, allowing them to continue terrorizing my opponent’s side of the field.

Ranger's Guile

Green also has its own ways of eliminating specific threats. Cards like Plummet (a situational means for dealing wi certain threats) are sided in for the right occasions.

Plummet

Overall, I am quite fond of this green deck, but alas I will have to rethink my strategy once Theros hits the Magic scene. A chunk of this green deck will be rotating out, so I might not be playing mono green in the next set unless I find good replacements for some card slots.

But in the meantime, mean green is fun to play in this format.

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One thought on “Card Me: Mono Green

  1. Nerdy Libby September 15, 2013 / 7:24 pm

    I agree! I love playing mono green, while mine is similarly straightforward it functions rather differently. Cool to see how other people interpret building around similar strategies.

    Like

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